What SheSays

Children look up to their parents, especially at a young age. Blue Cross Blue Shield has a couple commercials showing overweight parents making unhealthy decisions and their children following suit. Is this a good way to promote families making better decisions or putting them down?

These real women talk about this real issue this week on What SheSays.

The best exercise moves for YOUR body type

Every body is different so why should our workouts be the same?

They shouldn’t.

In this video, learn what exercise moves are best for your body type.

AND REMEMBER: MAKE SURE TO TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE STARTING ANY NEW FITNESS PROGRAM.

Here are the women in order:

Barb Kloeckner, a personal trainer and co-owner of Total Balance fitness and nutrition center in Fargo, demonstrates what she said is the best move for women with a pear-shaped body type to add to their fitness routines — the ball wall squat.

Xtreme Measures owner and personal trainer Mariah Prussia demonstrates what she said is the best exercise move for women with hourglass body shapes. The lunge with a wood chop is a total body work out that targets the arms, oblique muscles, core, glutes, and legs.

Pat Hesby, a personal trainer, group exercise instructor and Pilates personal trainer with Elements women’s health club in Fargo demonstrates the chest press with alternating toe taps – a great move for women with banana-shaped bodies, while Amy Wallach, the health club’s owner, talks her through the moves.

Molly Klein, a personal trainer with Total Balance fitness and nutrition center in Fargo, who also teaches group fitness classes and assists with nutrition classes, said the most important exercise move for people with apple-shaped bodies is cardio-focused. She demonstrates using a rowing machine, which is one of the best exercise options for beginners because it is a full-body workout with little impact on the legs.


Bottles of Hope

Mary Edmister of Moorhead uses polymer clay to transform glass bottles that once held medicine for cancer patients into beautiful works of art.

While each bottle is unique, they are all marked with the word hope.

The Bottles of Hope program, which is being done at hospitals around the world, started at Sanford Roger Maris Cancer Center in Fargo in August.

Edmister and her friend, Adele Schumacher of Horace, N.D., who also decorates bottles for the program, have made about 400 bottles each so far.

“Each of the bottles goes to the person with a lot of hope and wishes for health and our thoughts and prayers,” Edmister said. “I hope people feel that when they get their bottle.”

Sanford’s embrace cancer survivorship program launched the Bottles of Hope program in Fargo and provides the supplies and equipment for the bottles.